Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Death Rates Continue to Decline

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The 2010 Cancer Report Card offers some good news for everyone. The decade-long decline in U.S. diagnosis and death rates from breast, colon, and ovarian cancer in women continues. So does the decline in U.S. diagnosis and death rates from lung, prostate, and colon cancer in men.

The good news related to the decline in breast cancer rates is probably the result of improved breast cancer awareness, prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment.

Still, all the news is not good. Rates of some cancers are on the rise: lung and pancreatic cancer in women; kidney and esophagus cancer in men.

When it comes to breast cancer, we can do even better. Breast cancer is still the most common cancer diagnosed in U.S. women. More than 190,000 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010. More than 40,000 will die from breast cancer. Worldwide, more than 1 million women will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and 500,000 women will die.

Research and education are important components of the successes we've had in the battle with cancer. Research and education will continue to be key ingredients of future successes. Stay tuned to Breastcancer.org, where we strive to provide the most up-to-date information on better ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat breast cancer.

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