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Should males be concerned about genetic breast cancer risk?


Ask-the-Expert Online Conference

Question from WillRoth: I am a male who has had breast cancer. I have no children, but should my brother be concerned about his boys?
Answers - Terri McHugh A male with breast cancer has a 20% chance of having a BRCA mutation. Genetic testing would be indicated for you, and if you are found to have the mutation, then other family members can make decisions regarding testing.
Carol Cherry, M.S.N., R.N., A.P.R.N., B.C. I would strongly recommend to families who are considering genetic testing to seek out counseling as part of your decision making process. We've seen problems with a person being tested without fully understanding the process, and then having to pick up the pieces, so to speak, afterwards. I'd like to spare people that difficulty by having the counseling they deserve up front.
Terri McHugh When genetic testing is performed, it is also extremely important that the patients understand their breast cancer risk. Whether that risk be that of a mutation carrier, or one that is based on a family history in the absence of a mutation, it is important that these individuals are guided and have the appropriate screening and potentially risk reduction surgeries performed.

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