Black Women Less Likely to Get Chemo

Black Women Less Likely to Get Chemo

Research has shown that breast cancer in Black women is genetically different compared to breast cancer in white women. It's usually more aggressive and diagnosed at an earlier age and at a ...
Oct 16, 2007.This article is archived
We archive older articles so you can still read about past studies that led to today's standard of care.
 
Research has shown that breast cancer in Black women is genetically different compared to breast cancer in white women. It's usually more aggressive and diagnosed at an earlier age and at a more advanced stage.
A study suggests that Black women are less likely than white women to get treatment aimed at bringing about the best possible outcome. This is troubling. The researchers found that a number of factors explained the differences in treatment, including social and financial circumstances such as a lack of insurance. The researchers also found that differences in treatment preferences probably explained some of the difference. This might mean that more Black women may choose not to have chemotherapy even though there are no other obstacles to that treatment.
If you're a Black woman diagnosed with breast cancer, you can't change the genetics of the cancer. But, together with your medical team, you can work toward getting the best possible treatment for your unique situation.
Try to make your decisions based on knowledge, not fear or uncertainty. Talk to your doctor about ALL the treatment options appropriate for your situation. Together, you can make informed decisions that are best for YOU.

— Last updated on July 31, 2022, 10:43 PM

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