Endometriosis

Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a non-cancerous condition in which the cells that make up the lining of the uterus grow outside of the uterus.
 

Endometriosis is a non-cancerous condition in which the cells that make up the lining of the uterus (the endometrium) grow outside of the uterus. Most endometriosis is found on or under the ovaries, behind the uterus, or on the bowels or the bladder. Endometriosis rarely grows in other parts of the body.

Endometriosis may cause

Endometriosis usually also causes pain in the abdomen, lower back, or pelvic area.

Tamoxifen, a hormonal therapy, stimulates the growth of endometrial cells. This can cause endometriosis and also can increase the risk of endometrial cancer. Tamoxifen also can cause uneven thickening of the muscle and supportive tissues within the wall of the uterus.

The only way to know for sure if you have endometriosis is for your doctor to do a laparoscopy — a procedure that lets your doctor look inside your uterus. After giving you medicine so you don’t feel any pain, the doctor makes a small cut in the skin over the abdomen and inserts a thin tube with a special camera in it.

 

Managing endometriosis

If you’re taking tamoxifen and have abdominal, lower back, or pelvic pain, your doctor can prescribe medicine to help ease that pain. If your endometriosis is very large, your doctor may recommend surgery to remove it.

If you have unusual vaginal bleeding (bleeding outside of your normal monthly period), it’s important to talk with your doctor right away. Abnormal bleeding can be a symptom of endometrial cancer.

Doctors commonly recommend birth control pills as a treatment for endometriosis. If you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer, you cannot take birth control pills. Birth control pills contain estrogen and are not considered safe for people who have been diagnosed with breast cancer.

— Last updated on July 31, 2022, 10:49 PM