Members From Around the World

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Our Community is made up of a diverse group of members, logging in from around the world. We wanted to know what it's like to experience breast cancer from diagnosis to treatment through recovery in different countries. Some members have graciously offered to share their stories from different corners of the globe.

AH

"In May 2011, I found a large mass in my right breast and realized that there was also what looked like a stretch mark down one side of the breast. I had done regular self exams, and had been checked by doctors, but later learned that with lobular breast cancer, it is not unusual that the cancer is not detected until quite advanced." Read AH's story...


Anonymous

"There is a great strength derived from the knowledge that yes, I AM a Survivor, and I intend to survive this and whatever future challenges the universe presents to me." Read Anonymous's story...


ariom

"I sat in a room with another 17 women, all of us sitting in our Christian Dior robes, drinking tea and nibbling sandwiches, all reading the same page over and over, in our magazines. I remember looking around that room and thinking 'Wow, 2 of us are getting bad news today!'" Read Ariom's story...


Chevyboy

"I've been around here for almost 5 years now.... Started out just like you gals, scared to death on hearing those words: 'Well, it looks like breast cancer, but whatwewilldois
justtakeitoutprobablyradiationanditwillbeoverwith
....' It was all a blur...." 
Read Chevyboy's story...


AH

"Each day I spoil myself, I celebrate it, and my losses made me strong, positive and grateful to my parents, children and God. I think my strength also had to do with my culture, born in Bolivia where women are independent fighters." Read Criolla's story...


gardengirl66

"I never would have found it if was not for the strange pain on the other side, which has disappeared. I would not have had a mammogram till I was 50, three years later, and who knows what stage I would be at." Read Gardengirl66's story...


imheretoo

"The failure to notify me of my mammogram results and the problem of getting skipped on the screening two years ago is actually pretty typical of Italian 'functioning'. The screening program just doesn't have enough workers to keep up with the task it has taken on." Read imheretoo's story...


marianelizabeth

"In late July I found a lump as I woke up -- my hands were cold and I put them in my armpits. Found a lump in right breast and half hour later was at a drop-in clinic as my GP was away all summer.... Had had a regular mammogram 7 months before and was told all good, come back in 2 years." Read marianelizabeth's story...


AH

"One morning sometime in 2004, I found a hard lump in my right breast just below the nipple and my skin got dimpled. As there was no pain, I thought everything will be alright and just carried on with that lump for about one year without going to any doctor. Simply to say that I was not aware about breast cancer." Read rajkumari's story...


redreading

"It was me and it was my reactions, my side effects that counted, not how others perceived them. I found very little funny for a very long time, even if I did suck it up for outsiders and put on my happy face. I’m glad to be out of that place of self-absorption and back in the land of the truly happy now." Read RedReading's story...


ruthbru

"A quote I found as I began that process really struck me: 'It is what it is. It becomes what you make it.' The last year had happened. No amount of regrets or second guessing was going to change anything there but....what was I going to make out of it?" Read ruthbru's story...


sylviaexmouthuk

"In the UK we are told we can get second opinions, that we have the right to do it, but I am not sure whether doctors like it. I think the medical profession has had to open up more in the UK because of the internet and forums like this, where patients are getting lots of information and can speak up for themselves to doctors." Read sylviaexmouthuk's story...


trisha-anne

"I thought I was lucky -- it was breast cancer! If I was going to get cancer surely breast cancer was a pretty good one to get -- I could cut off my breast and it would all be okay. I can live easily without a breast, it wasn't my brain or some other vital organ after all. I think I conveniently blocked out the fact that someone very close to me had died of breast cancer." Read Trisha-Anne's story...


wendy

"Now it's time to continue life with a new vision. Committed to enjoy every moment, to make every new minute of life worth more than the last minute. Also, regardless of our borders and language, I would like our motto to be: 'Fight for those who did not have a chance to fight.'" Read Wendy's story...


Want to share your story? Email community@breastcancer.org or join our Discussion Boards.



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