Infections Following Breast Cancer Surgery More Common Than Expected

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While most women who have breast cancer surgery WON'T develop an infection, a study found that infections after breast surgery happen more often than expected.

This study found:

  • More than 1 in 20 women (a little higher than 5%) developed an infection at the site of the incision after breast surgery.
  • The risk of infection was different depending on the type of surgery that was being done:
    • 4% for mastectomy with no reconstruction
    • 12% for surgery with implant reconstruction
    • 7% for reconstruction surgery using skin and/or muscle from the belly area
    • 1% for breast reduction surgery

It can be hard to think about the possibility of infection when you're making important decisions about your treatment plan. If surgery is a part of your treatment for breast cancer and you're concerned about the possibility of infection, talk to your doctor about:

  • How often infections occur after the type of surgery you're having in the hospital you'll be using.
  • How that infection rate compares to the infection rate at other area hospitals.
  • The possibility of your surgery being done as an outpatient procedure or with a short hospital stay after surgery. Many infections after surgery happen because of germs in the hospital environment.
  • The steps that will be taken before, during, and after surgery to reduce the risk of infection. For example, some doctors recommend that people scheduled for surgery use a special washing procedure before coming to the hospital. Other doctors may prescribe antibiotics before or during surgery to lower the risk of infection.

It's important to remember that most women having breast surgery will NOT develop an infection. If an infection does develop, it usually can be treated successfully with antibiotics. Together, you and your doctor can develop a plan that is the best for YOU.

In the breastcancer.org Surgery section, you can read more about what to expect before, during, and after surgery to treat breast cancer.

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