Femara

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Femara (chemical name: letrozole) is an aromatase inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat:

  • postmenopausal women diagnosed with hormone-receptor-positive, early-stage breast cancer right after surgery (or possibly chemotherapy and radiation) to reduce the risk of the cancer coming back
  • postmenopausal women diagnosed with hormone-receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer who have taken 5 years of tamoxifen to reduce the risk of the cancer coming back
  • postmenopausal women diagnosed with advanced-stage or metastatic hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer 

Femara won't work on hormone-receptor-negative breast cancer.

Femara is a pill taken once a day. Most doctors recommend taking Femara at the same time each day.

In 2011, the FDA gave approval for 11 pharmaceutical companies to make a generic version of Femara, which may go by the chemical name letrozole.

You should not take Femara if you are breastfeeding, pregnant, trying to get pregnant, or if there is any chance that you could be pregnant. Femara may cause damage to developing embryos. You should use an effective non-hormonal type of birth control -- such as condoms, a diaphragm along with spermicide, or a non-hormonal I.U.D. – while you are taking Femara. Ask your doctor which type of non-hormonal birth control would be best for you, as well as how long you should use this type of birth control after you stop taking Femara.

Benefits of Femara

Two large studies have shown the benefits of Femara.

The international BIG 1-98 trial, started in 1998, compared Femara to tamoxifen after surgery in postmenopausal women diagnosed with hormone-receptor-positive, early-stage breast cancer. The results showed that Femara was better than tamoxifen for:

  • increasing the time before the cancer comes back in those who experience recurrence
  • reducing the risk of the cancer spreading to other parts of the body

The MA-17 study, conducted in Canada, looked at whether taking Femara for 5 years AFTER taking tamoxifen for 5 years (for a total of 10 years of hormonal therapy) could lower the risk of the cancer coming back in postmenopausal women diagnosed with hormone-receptor-positive, early-stage breast cancer. The results showed that Femara:

  • reduced the risk of the cancer coming back
  • reduced the risk of the cancer spreading to another part of the body

compared to not taking Femara after 5 years of tamoxifen.

Side effects of Femara

Because Femara lowers the amount of estrogen in the body, less estrogen reaches bone cells, which can lead to bone thinning and weakening and a higher-than-average risk of broken bones. This side effect can be very troubling for some women. If you have osteoporosis, your doctor may recommend that you take tamoxifen rather than Femara because of this possible side effect.

Other common side effects of Femara are:

Some women may have other side effects while taking Femara:

Some side effects may mean that you're having an allergic reaction to Femara. If you have shortness of breath or chest pain, call your doctor immediately. 

How long do I take Femara?

In most cases, you'll take Femara for 5 years. Doctors may recommend that some women take it for a longer period of time.

Does insurance cover Femara?

While costs vary, Femara can cost several hundred dollars per month. Femara also is available as a generic medicine, which is usually less expensive. If you have health insurance, check with your insurance company to see if and how much of the cost of Femara is covered. If you don't have health insurance or your insurance doesn't cover the cost of Femara, ask your doctor or nurse about programs in your area that may be able to help. Also, ask your doctor about prescribing a generic version of Femara, which may be less expensive.

Novartis, the company that makes Femara, has created the Femara My Next Steps program, which may be able to help with costs. In the United States, visit the Femara website for more information.

You can also read the Breastcancer.org Paying for Your Care section for information on additional types of financial assistance and cost-lowering tips.


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