comscoreDoes 2.5 to 5 More Years of an Aromatase Inhibitor Offer Benefits? Maybe, For Some Women: 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium

Does 2.5 to 5 More Years of an Aromatase Inhibitor Offer Benefits? Maybe, For Some Women: 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium

Terry Mamounas, MD, MPH discusses who may benefit from extra years of an aromatase inhibitor.
Dec 20, 2016
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In 2012, research results showed that taking the hormonal therapy tamoxifen for 10 years instead of 5 offered more benefits for women diagnosed with early-stage, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer, including less recurrence and better overall survival. Since that time, researchers have wondered if extending the time a woman with early-stage, hormone-receptor-positive disease took an aromatase inhibitor would offer similar benefits.

In this podcast from the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, Dr. Terry Mamounas discusses the results of his and other studies looking at whether 2.5 to 5 additional years of Femara (chemical name: letrozole) after 5 years of an aromatase inhibitor offered better survival or lowered the number of recurrences.

Listen to the podcast to hear Dr. Mamounas talk about:

  • the very specific group of women that may benefit from an additional 2.5 to 5 years of an aromatase inhibitor

  • which woman should not take an additional 2.5 to 5 years of an aromatase inhibitor

  • how women and their doctors can weigh the benefits and potential risks of extended aromatase inhibitor treatment

  • how he plans to talk to his patients about this issue

About the guest
 
Terry Mamounas, MD, MPH, FACS

Dr. Terry Mamounas is medical director of the comprehensive breast program at Orlando Health UF Health Cancer Center.

— Last updated on June 29, 2022, 2:48 PM

 
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