comscoreCOVID-19 Testing Confusion

COVID-19 Testing Confusion

Megan Kruse, MD, explains how she's talking to her patients about COVID-19 testing and how someone who is immunocompromised should approach testing.
Sep 30, 2020
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On Aug. 24, 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) modified its COVID-19 testing guidelines to say that people who don’t have symptoms don’t need to be tested, even if they’ve been exposed to the virus. Many experts questioned the change, and on Aug. 26, the director of the CDC issued a statement saying that, “testing may be considered for all close contacts of confirmed or probable COVID-19 patients.” It’s the “may be considered” language that seems to be confusing people.

Dr. Kruse joins us to help clear up any confusion about COVID-19 testing recommendations.

Listen to the podcast to hear Dr. Kruse explain:

  • how she’s talking to her patients about COVID-19 testing

  • how someone who is immunocompromised should approach COVID-19 testing

  • why testing recommendations for people being treated for breast cancer have to be nuanced

Editor’s Note: This episode was recorded before September 18, 2020, when the CDC again changed its recommendations on COVID-19 testing to say that people without symptoms should talk to their doctor about being tested if they may have been exposed to the virus.

About the guest
 
megan-kruse-headshot
Megan Kruse, MD

Dr. Megan Kruse is a breast medical oncologist at the Cleveland Clinic.

— Last updated on January 12, 2022, 7:56 PM

 
 
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