comscoreKisqali Plus Femara Seems Best Option for Advanced-Stage Hormone-Receptor-Positive HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

Kisqali Plus Femara Seems Best Option for Advanced-Stage Hormone-Receptor-Positive HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

Dr. Gabriel Hortobagyi discusses overall survival results from the MONALEESA-2 trial.
Oct 1, 2021
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At the European Society for Medical Oncology Congress 2021, Dr. Gabriel Hortobagyi presented overall survival results from the MONALEESA-2 trial, which compared the combination of Kisqali and Femara to Femara alone to treat advanced-stage hormone-receptor-positive HER2-negative breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Earlier results from the study found that adding Kisqali to Femara improved progression-free survival — the amount of time the women lived without the cancer growing. These new results found that the combination of Kisqali and Femara also improved overall survival — the length of time women lived whether the cancer grew or not.

Listen to the episode to hear Dr. Hortobagyi explain:

  • the goals of the MONALEESA-2 study

  • why the overall survival difference of more than 1 year is so important

  • whether the improvement in overall survival is likely to be the same no matter which aromatase inhibitor is used

  • what the results mean for postmenopausal women diagnosed with
    advanced-stage hormone-receptor-positive HER2-negative breast cancer



About the guest
 
gabriel hortobagyi headshot
Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, MD, FACP

Affiliations: MD Anderson Cancer Center, American Society of Clinical Oncology, SWOG

Areas of specialization: breast cancer, breast medical oncology, general
oncology

Dr. Gabriel Hortobagyi is professor of breast medical oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. He is a past president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and is one of the world’s leading authorities on breast cancer treatment. He has published more than 1,000 papers in peer-reviewed journals.



— Last updated on February 11, 2022, 7:58 PM

 
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