comscore"CDK4/6 Inhibitor Plus Hormonal Therapy Should Be First Treatment for Metastatic Hormone-Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer" ESMO 2019 Coverage

"CDK4/6 Inhibitor Plus Hormonal Therapy Should Be First Treatment for Metastatic Hormone-Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer" ESMO 2019 Coverage

Dr. Dennis Slamon discusses overall survival results from the MONALEESA-3 study.
Oct 15, 2019
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At the European Society for Medical Oncology 2019 Congress, Dr. Slamon presented overall survival results from the MONALEESA-3 study, looking at using the CDK4/6 inhibitor Kisqali (chemical name: ribociclib) plus the hormonal therapy Faslodex (chemical name: fulvestrant) to treat advanced-stage, hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

Listen to the podcast to hear Dr. Slamon explain:

  • the background of the MONALEESA-3 study

  • how much adding Kisqali to Faslodex improved overall survival compared to Faslodex alone

  • treatment side effects seen in the study

  • what the results mean for people diagnosed with metastatic hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer

About the guest
 
dennis-slamon-headshot
Dennis Slamon, MD

Dr. Dennis Slamon is professor of medicine and executive vice chair for research for the UCLA Department of Medicine. He also serves as director of clinical/translational research and director of the Revlon/UCLA Women's Cancer Research Program at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA. He is probably best known for doing the laboratory and clinical research that led to the development of Herceptin, the first medicine to specifically treat HER2-positive breast cancer. Dr. Slamon has won numerous awards for his research. Earlier this month, he received the 2019 Lasker Award for clinical medical research for his groundbreaking work on Herceptin.

— Last updated on February 11, 2022, 7:58 PM

 
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