Experimental Talazoparib Seems Better Than Chemotherapy for Metastatic HER2-Negative Disease in Women With a BRCA Mutation

Experimental Talazoparib Seems Better Than Chemotherapy for Metastatic HER2-Negative Disease in Women With a BRCA Mutation

Jennifer Litton, MD, discusses experiemental treatment talazoparib.
Jan 16, 2020
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Dr. Jennifer Litton discusses the results of the EMBRACA study she presented at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium showing that talazoparib, an experimental targeted therapy medicine, improved the time until the cancer grew in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who had been diagnosed with metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer compared to chemotherapy.

Listen to the podcast to hear Dr. Litton explain:

  • how talazoparib works

  • whether talazoparib will offer benefits to women with other mutations linked to a higher risk of breast cancer

  • how the side effects differed between talazoparib and chemotherapy

  • why quality of life was better in women who were treated with talazoparib

Editor's Note: Talzenna (chemical name: talazoparib) was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Oct. 16, 2018, for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer in women with BRCA mutations. Learn more about Talzenna.

About the guest
 
Jennifer Litton headshot
Jennifer Litton, MD

Dr. Jennifer Litton is a board-certified medical oncologist and professor of breast medical oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, where she is also vice president of clinical research. She also is a member of the Breast Immuno-Oncology Task Force of the National Cancer Institute.

— Last updated on June 29, 2022, 2:45 PM

 
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