comscoreAcupuncture Helps Ease Joint Pain Caused by Aromatase Inhibitors

Acupuncture Helps Ease Joint Pain Caused by Aromatase Inhibitors

Dawn Hershman, MD, discusses research on acupuncture to ease AI-caused joint pain.
Dec 21, 2017
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Joint pain is one of the most common side effects of aromatase inhibitors and may be a big reason why women stop taking these medicines early. Dr. Dawn Hershman presented research at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium showing that acupuncture can ease aromatase inhibitor-caused joint pain, even after the acupuncture treatment sessions stop.

Listen to the podcast to hear Dr. Hershman explain:

  • how much acupuncture eases joint pain

  • why she believes acupuncture could help many women stick to their hormonal therapy treatment plans

  • the cost of acupuncture relative to other treatments

  • the few and mild side effects of acupuncture

About the guest
 
dawn hershman headshot
Dawn L. Hershman, MD

Affiliations: Columbia University Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, American Society of Clinical Oncology, SWOG

Areas of specialization: breast cancer, medical oncology, cancer population science

Dr. Dawn Hershman is professor of medicine and epidemiology at Columbia
University. She also serves as leader of the Breast Cancer Program at the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia and is nationally recognized for her expertise in breast cancer treatment, prevention, and survivorship. A member of the Breastcancer.org Professional Advisory Board, Dr. Hershman also has conducted extensive research on breast cancer treatment and quality of life — she has published more than 250 scientific papers and has received the Advanced Clinical Research Award in Breast Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Advanced Medical Achievement Award from the Avon Foundation. Dr. Hershman is also on the editorial board of the Journal of Clinical Oncology and is an associate editor at the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

— Last updated on May 2, 2022, 5:42 PM

 
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